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Short Introduction to Naturalist Charles Darwin

Short Introduction to Naturalist Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin was a British naturalist who devoted his life to the study of nature and geology. He is best known for his extensive contributions to the study of evolution.

Darwin was born in 1809 to a wealthy family. His father was a prominent doctor who influenced Darwin to study medicine in his youth. He was sent to continue in his footsteps at the University of Edinburgh Medical School. To his father’s dismay Darwin was squeamish during surgeries and uninterested in lectures.

Despite being enrolled at the best medical school in the UK Darwin focused his attention on theories that challenged religious entanglements with science. He became immersed in the study of marine invertebrates, and spent a great deal of time learning to classify plants and assemble the botany collection of the University Museum.

Darwin’s father attempted to reshape his interests again by transferring him to Cambridge’s Christ College. This course of education would have led Darwin to become an Anglican parson, but Darwin had other ideas. He spent a great deal of time on recreation, and on assembling a large beetle collection. He graduated in 1831 with an ordinary degree and a great deal of interest in natural theology. He had become a close friend of botanist and professor John Stevens Henslow who would subsequently recommend Darwin embark on an expedition on the HMS Beagle.

Darwin boarded the HMS Beagle in 1831 in the role of the gentleman naturalist. The five year voyage was intended to survey the South American coastline. Darwin assisted with geological surveys and kept a journal of his findings while also collecting fossils. At the end of the journey Darwin wrote that his findings seemed to reveal secrets about the origin of species. He’d also completed a great deal of experiential research pertaining to anthropology,geology, and zoology. Excerpts from his journals and letters had been distributed amongst scientific circles in England.

By March of 1837 as he organized his findings in writing Darwin mapped out his perception of an evolutionary tree. By June he was including his thoughts about sexual reproduction and lifespan as they applied to the adaptations of species. He used this research as a basis for his most famous theory of natural selection which was finally published in 1856.

Darwin died in 1882 at the age of 73 after a long life of scientific study. His published works provide immense value globally, and he has been described as among the most truly influential people in the world’s history.…

Puerto Princesa School of Arts and Trades: Technical Education and Training Provider in Palawan

Puerto Princesa School of Arts and Trades: Technical Education and Training Provider in Palawan

PPSAT is one of the 125 Technical Education and Skills Development Authority Technology (TESDA) Institutions in the Philippines. It provides competency-based training programs and strengthens linkages with partners to develop competent workers for local and global employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for quality life. The school is an Accredited Assessment Center and Venue for various qualifications; a Regional Site for Language Skills Programs since 2008. It offers 16 Qualifications registered under the Unified TVET Program Registration and Accreditation System (UTPRAS). In December 2011, the school offered Training Methodology Program for the trainers handling TVET qualifications.

In October, 2011, the school has been accredited with the Asia Pacific Accreditation and Certification Commission (APACC) and a recipient of a bronze level award. This shows that its physical resources, faculty, curriculum, governance and management, are as good as those in the Asia Pacific Region’s TVET schools. The award received motivates its faculty and staff to continue working for the attainment of school’s vision, mission and objectives; as it belongs to the first 21 schools of the 125 to submit for accreditation.

As of these days, the school does not only cater high school graduates. It accommodates college graduates who wants to be technically trained, college undergraduates who dropped from school due to financial constraints, military personnel endorsed by officials from the Armed Forces to take programs prior to their retirement. It likewise recognizes high school undergraduates who have prior learning based on experience and graduates of the Alternative Learning System.

The Puerto Princesa School of Arts and Trades (PPSAT) is located along Rafols Road, Barangay Sta. Monica, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan, Philippines. The school was created under Republic Act 7928 on March 1, 1995 to offer technology programs to the high school graduates who cannot afford to take a four-year college program. It started offering a two-year program in Construction and Electronics Sector. On March, 2003, it had been identified as a Center of Technical Excellence with Machining as its Distinctive Area of Competence. The school was one of the 41 school-beneficiary of Technical Education and Skills Development projects funded by Asian Development Bank. This leads to more programs registered and opened to serve its clients.

Currently, the school strengthens its partnership with Local Government Units, Non-Government Units and industries to meet graduates supply and employment demand of the country. It closely coordinates with the TESDA-Palawan Provincial Office and other Offices for quality delivery of services for customer satisfaction.

As of 2011, PPSAT had produced 2,413 graduates, and 64% are already working. It serves more out-of-school youths who aspire for technical jobs in the Philippines and abroad.

© 2013 March Clarissa C. Posadas…

Maslow on My Mind: How Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Affects Business and Society

Maslow on My Mind: How Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Affects Business and Society

Introduction: Maslow in the Big Apple

Abraham Maslow was born in New York in 1908 to poor, uneducated Russian immigrants. He was the oldest of seven children, and therefore pushed by his parents to succeed in education where they had not. Originally studying to be a lawyer, he found it to be of little interest and eventually shifted over to psychology where he excelled. Maslow went on to receive his PhD in Psychology at the University of Wisconsin, under the tutelage of Harry Harlow, famous for experimentation with rhesus monkeys and attachment behavior. After some time he returned to New York and began studying human sexuality. In addition to this study, during the years of teaching, he had the opportunity to meet many well-respected psychologists which further helped to shape his thoughts on the human needs. The final event which led Maslow to move in the humanistic direction came from the study of the development of the concept of “self-actualization”. It was this study that led Maslow to develop his famous Hierarchy of Needs Theory.[1]

Food for thought: What humans really need

Until Maslow began to develop his theories, most studies on human nature focused on biology, achievement or power to explain the forces that drive us.

Maslow postulated that there were five levels of basic needs that every human attempts to attain:

Externally-Satisfied Needs (basic needs that every individual must satisfy before they can progress).

1. Physiological – I’m hungry.

2. Safety – I’m scared.

Internally-Satisfied Needs (needs leading to enlightenment and understanding.

3. Social – I’m lonely.

4. Esteem – I can’t.

5. Self Actualization – I can!

In the 1970s, Maslow further split this hierarchy up into a total of eight levels:[2]

1) Physiological: hunger, thirst, bodily comforts, etc.;

2) Safety/security: out of danger;

3) Belonging and Love: affiliate with others, be accepted; and

4) Esteem: to achieve, be competent, gain approval and recognition.

5) Cognitive: to know, to understand, and explore; (new)

6) Aesthetic: symmetry, order, and beauty; (new)

7) Self-actualization: to find self-fulfillment and realize one’s potential; and

8) Self-transcendence: to connect to something beyond the ego or to help others find self-fulfillment and realize their potential. (new) (This concept is relatively new and many authors such as Dr. Stephen covey express similar views.)[3]

Another way to look at the Needs is to break it into “D-Needs” (Deficiency) and “B-Needs” (Being). Maslow believed that the deficiency needs, once satisfied ceased to be a driving force for the individual, and they were then free to move upward to developing themselves.

If we follow the traditional hierarchical form, we can see that each need forms the basis of the next need above it in the pyramid. Without these previous foundations, Maslow believed that it is impossible to move on to the next stage in the hierarchy.[4]

In spite of the fact that it is very well-known and intrinsically comforting, there seems to be little hard evidence that the theory actually applies to people in general. Even Maslow …

Setting The Tone For A Positive Learning Environment

Setting The Tone For A Positive Learning Environment

Every teacher has a responsibility to provide a healthy learning environment for his or her students. Over the years, volumes of research have been conducted to help teachers determine what works best for the students. There is a wealth of methods and techniques that, through research, have been proven to improve the quality of the learning environment. Many different aspects of the learning environment should be considered.

A positive learning environment is one in which school staff, students, and parents build safe and peaceful environments where people feel accepted and respected and where learning is the main focus (Stratman, n.d.). Therefore, a positive school climate exists when all students feel comfortable, wanted, valued, accepted, and secure in an environment where they can interact with caring people they trust. A positive school climate affects everyone associated with the school, being the students, staff, parents, and the community. It is the belief system or culture that underlies the day-to-day operation of a school. “Improved school climate is a goal to pursue. Educators need to constantly work toward improving their school climate, culture, and conditions so that student learning is improved” (Noonan, 2004 p.64). How Teachers Can Set the Tone for a Positive Learning Environment

There are many things a teacher can do to make his or her classroom a safe and positive place for students to learn. First and foremost, a teacher needs to be enthusiastic about her or himself. They must come in with an energetic attitude. They must be positive because it radiates. How the teacher feels and appears it will affect the classroom. The teacher is the facilitator, the teacher sets an example, and the teacher is the role model. Attitude goes a long way.

When teachers come to work stressed-out, it can be damaging to the students. A study conducted by Yoon (2002) investigated whether or not teacher stress, negative affect, and self-efficacy would predict the quality of student-teacher relationships. Findings suggested, “negative teacher-student relationships were predicted by teacher stress. Significant correlations were found among negative affect, teacher stress and negative relationships”(p.486).

The teacher should also share with the students the importance of an education and the importance of being independent. So if they see a teacher enthused about learning and ideas are shared, then the students will feel the same as well. Teachers can also help create a positive environment by simply caring for the students and showing each of them that they are special. Furthermore, they should be taught to respect and care for each other.

Teachers should regularly conduct research to stay up-to-date on the best practices and methods to use in creating a positive learning environment. Freda Glatt, a retired teacher who firmly believes in the benefits of a positive learning environment has shared some tips on creating a positive learning environment through the Sandral Sensations website (2003):

Make sure each child knows that he is important to you as an individual. Give eye contact and a pleasant greeting to every child each morning. …

Dr Reverend Michael Bernard Beckwith

Dr Reverend Michael Bernard Beckwith

Michael Beckwith was born in 1956. His first experience with religion wasn’t an entirely pleasant one, and he left his native Methodist and Congregational church at 16. As he has said since, “it just wasn’t feeding me. I liked the teachings of Jesus, but I didn’t see people practicing what he said.” Like many other baby boomers, he began investigating Eastern and African modes of spirituality the 1970s. However, unlike many of them, he decided to found his own church by the time he was 30.

The interdenominational church that became Agape was founded on the notion of New Thought-Ancient Wisdom — generally that focusing your mind and training your thoughts allows you could more fully experience the single divine force at the heart of every living thing and communicate that to others through your actions. Though the New Thought Movement is quite old, going as far back in one form or another to such figures from the turn of the last century as William Walker Atkinson and Phineas Parkhurst Quimby, it remains vital today as several different denominations, such as Religious Science.

Michael was ordained in Religious Science in 1985, and he soon began teaching a few friends at his home. In 1986 he founded Agape International Spiritual Centre in Santa Monica, California. In just a few years, membership swelled. Eventually the ministry found a new, much larger home in Culver City, California, where it remains today.

What started out as that small gathering of practitioners has today grown into a centre that serves a congregation estimated at nearly 10,000 each week. While the message may seem to differ from that of the more “mainstream” churches, Reverend Beckwith’s church is responsible for a bevy of ministries such as, aiding poor and disadvantaged individuals in the US and worldwide. Other campaigns include supporting orphanages for the survivors of AIDS, the peace movement, food distribution to the local homeless populations and environmental advocacy.

Today, the Church itself is a model of interracial and interdenominational harmony. Indeed, many members continue with their various faiths in addition to feeling the message at Agape. While the congregation does include the wealthy and powerful people who live and work in the nearby area, people of all backgrounds witness the rousing spectacle that is a service at Beckwith’s church.

As a founding member of the Association for Global New Thought in 2000, “dedicated to creating a spiritual transformation of the Earth as a whole,” Michael continues working to promote peace and forgiveness. The charter documents declare an emphasis on the shared nature of all life and the birthright of abundance that is each member’s right.

The Reverend Beckwith has received a great deal of attention lately, from other devotional and service groups, appearing as a guest columnist in several devotional websites and magazines. With other members of the New Thought movement, he had an audience with the Dali Lama. At Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, the all-black men’s institution has installed him in their Wall of …

A Quick Biography of Jacob Bogatin

A Quick Biography of Jacob Bogatin

Jacob Bogatin, born as Yakov Gershevich Bogatin on August, 13th in 1947. He attended Saratov’s elementary and middle schools. Then he continued his education in Saratov’s Mathematical School. Being in the 9th grade Jacob started a pilot and sky jumping program in Gagarin Aviation School. In 1965 after graduation from high school the young man applied to Cinematography College in Moscow but it was unsuccessful. Later he was accepted in Saratov State University and graduated with physics degree in 1970.

Immediately afterwards Jacob took a junior research post at Saratov State University and got a PhD in Physics. Since then he had established the largest magnetic laboratory in Volga region and equipped it with modern scientific machinery such as: Jeol and Comeca Micro analyzer, Magnetic Spectra analyzer and 500 thousand magnification Electronic microscopes. In 1971 he got married. From 1973 till 1985 the professor published over 100 articles about permanent magnets. In 1978 young fellow invented the powerful ND-Fe-B permanent magnets which are used in electronics, cars and jets nowadays. In 1977 Jacob received a full professorship in physics. Under his leadership many undergraduate students got their PhD’s and became scientists. His relationship with Russian government started worsening right after his mother and sister immigrated to Israel. In 1985 young professor applied for an immigration visa which was denied twice. In 1987 the man finally granted a permission to leave Russia and immigrate to the United States. His family was given 10 days to leave Russia.

In 1987 Bogatin emigrated to the USA and joined the Airspace Company in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. From 1987 to 1988 he had been a manager of magnetic department and built a research center with magnetic laboratory. In 1989 he invented the first Uranium Rare-Earth Metal Magnet along with the Aquanides Magnet.

During 1988-1993 the scientist lectured at UPEN for an undergraduate program.

His children graduated in 1992 and 1998 from UPEN and Haneman University, they got married later on. His daughter has two children, his son has one child.

In 1993 the scholar organized a Magnetic Company to manufacture magnets.

In 1998 Jacob started a green field operation for his daughter and his son-in-law. Moreover, in 2000 he built a 3500 feet medical center with a doctor’s office, radiology and physical therapy departments.

In 2002 he made a decision to issue the first glossy monthly publication for the Russian community in the USA and Canada called The Health Magazine. Five years later the magazine became the only successful periodical with a circulation of over 50,000 copies per month.

In 2002 the scientist was hired by a group of private investors to build a 22000 square feet diagnostic center. In 2003 Radiology department with 25 employees opened its doors to give community an access for the newest technology: Siemens 1.5 tesla short board MRI, 64 slices CT Scan, Dual head Nuclear medicine and many more.

In 2003 the professor opened a Sleep Disorder Center for patients with sleep disorders.

In 2004 Jacob completed a radiation oncology …

Committees and Commissions Towards Values in India

Committees and Commissions Towards Values in India

The importance of value education has beenduly recognized by different education commissions and committees appointed by the government.

The Hartog Committee of (1929) felt that religious instruction can be given in common schools outside the school hours.

The Central Advisory Board of education felt in (1946) that religious and moral instruction was important and that it should be left to the community to which the pupils belong. Ø The Radhakrishnan Commission (1948) felt that “if we exclude spiritual training in our institutions we would be untrue to our whole historical development”.

The Secondary Education Commission’s report in (1953) favored that religious and moral instruction should be given in schools outside the school hours on voluntary basis. Ø The Sri Prakasa Commission of Religious and Moral instruction (1959) had recommended that moral education should be imparted in all educational institutions.

Kothari Commission (1964-66) felt that “a serious defect in the school system is the absence of provision for education in social, moral and spiritual values. A national system of education that is related to life, needs and aspirations of the people cannot afford to ignore this purposeful force”.

National Policy on Education (1986) felt that “the growing concern over the erosion of essential values and an increasing cynicism in society has brought to focus the need for readjustments in the curriculum in order to make education a forceful tool for the cultivation of social and moral values”.

Programme of Action (NPE) (1992) recommended that “the framework emphasized value education as an integral part of school curriculum. It highlighted the values drawn from national goals, universal perception, ethical considerations and character building. It stressed the role of education in combating obscurantism, religious fanaticism, exploitation and injustice as well as the inculcation of values”. The main function of education is to produce citizens with sound character and a healthy personality. Good citizens are the only hope for the progress and prosperity of the country. Inspiring values, ideals, proper moral conduct, life based upon good principles is an essential requisite. The ideals of virtue, goodness, true manliness from the very essence of real dignified living.…

Why Become a Tutor? 10 Good Reasons to Consider Teaching As a Career

Why Become a Tutor? 10 Good Reasons to Consider Teaching As a Career

There are many tutoring jobs available online, from institutions like ILEX and the Open University to private companies like Academic Knowledge. So why be a tutor?

Here are my top ten reasons for considering this type of work.

1. Student Potential

Unfortunately, not every student that you try to help will succeed. However, this fact should not keep you from believing that every student has the potential for success. This potential is so exciting – each new year presents new challenges and new potential successes.

2. Student Successes

Closely related to the previous reason, student success is what drives teachers to continue. Each student who didn’t understand a concept and then goes on to learn it with your help will give you an exhilarating feeling. And when you actually reach that student that others have written off as being unteachable, this can truly be worth all the headaches that do come with the job. Imagine how good the feeling is when you know that just one – a single one – student has achieved something because of you. Now multiply this by the number of students you are likely to serve each year. That’s one amazing feel good factor!

3. Teaching a Subject Helps You Learn a Subject

You will never learn a topic better than when you start teaching it. When you’re at University, you’ll think you’ve crammed in just about everything you could possibly need to know about your area of expertise. But as a teacher, you’ll find that student questions just make you dig deeper and learn more.

4. Daily Humour

If you have a positive attitude and a sense of humour, you will find things to laugh about each day. Sometimes it will be silly jokes you will make up as you teach that might get a laugh from your students. Sometimes it will be jokes that kids share with you. And sometimes students will come out with the funniest statements without realizing what they’ve said. Find the fun and enjoy it!

5. Affecting the Future

Yes it might be trite, but it is true. Teachers mould the future each day in class. In fact, it is a sad fact that you will see some of these students more consistently day-to-day than their parents will.

6. Staying Younger

Being around young people everyday will help you remain knowledgeable about current trends and ideas in your area of expertise. It also helps break down barriers.

7. Autonomy in the Classroom

Once a teacher closes that door each day and begins teaching, they really are the ones who decide what’s going to happen. Not many jobs provide an individual with so much room to be creative and autonomous each day.

8. Conducive to Family Life

If you have children, working as a teacher will typically allow you to have the same days off as your kids. Further, while you might bring work home with you to grade, you will probably be getting home close to the same time …

How Do Allowing Statements Help the Law of Attraction?

How Do Allowing Statements Help the Law of Attraction?

There are three steps to activate the law of attraction. First you must identify what you want. Often this is done by identifying what you don’t want and then, stating the exact opposite.

The second step is to give attention to your desire. Some refer to this step simply as asking. In this step you make your intention known and put out positive vibrations to attract what you want

The third and often the most difficult step is allowing. In the allowing step you get ready to receive. In order to receive, you must remove all doubt and any negative vibrations.

If you are sure about what you want, are clear about asking, but doubt it will happen, it will not come your way. The negative thoughts will create resistance.

Michael Losier coined the term allowing statement in his book “The Law of Attraction. Allowing statements can help you deal with doubt and negative thoughts by following a simple process. Allowing statements allow you to remove doubt by creating a possibility. You can create this possibility by asking yourself some simple questions.

Here’s an example of how the process works. Let’s say your desire is to attract abundance and wealth. While you want wealth, you have doubts you can attain it because of your educational background. Perhaps you did not finish college.

Now, some simple questions enter into the equation. The first question is, “Is there anyone on the planet who became wealthy without the benefit of a college education? The obvious answer is yes and your research will back this up.

The next question to ask is “If so, how many, people today, yesterday, and so on became wealthy without attending college? Throughout the ages, the answer is simply lots of people. This knowledge can now be used to counteract any doubt you may have.

We can now construct an allowing statement. In some ways, it is similar to an affirmation, but it is targeted directly at the doubt you have uncovered. Here is your allowing statement in this example. “Lots of people have become wealthy without attending college.”

This statement will now counteract the limiting belief that cast doubt over your ability to manifest what you desire. The positive proof that your attainment is possible can now help you to allow the manifestation to occur in your life.…

The Benefits of Music Education to Children

The Benefits of Music Education to Children

Introduction

Music is a very powerful subject – It has been used since the Greek times for healing, communication, relaxation and for enjoyment. Even before birth we are aware of our mother’s heartbeat and during infancy are relaxed by the song of a lullaby. Every day everybody hears some form of musical pitch or rhythm and it can even be found in nature such as how birds communicate through a song-like speech.

Music is such a powerful force, it creates deep emotions in humans – it is played at weddings for happiness, in horror films and during war for fear and at home for happiness and because of this lends itself to relaxation, stress relief and health therapy – and the connection between music, body, and soul has even been shown to improve physical and mental health.

Skills such as working in teams, communication, self-esteem, creative thinking, calmer attitudes, imagination, discipline, study skills and invention are learnt and improved through the study of music and by focusing on the fact that young children are mostly highly receptive to pitch and rhythm – one of the main ways a child learns its language – that we can drive education in music to children to help them with benefits ranging success in society and in life.

“We believe the skills the arts teach -creative thinking, problem-solving, risk-taking, teamwork and communications – are precisely the tools the workforce of tomorrow will need. If we don’t encourage students to master these skills through quality arts instruction today, how can we ever expect them to succeed in their highly competitive business careers tomorrow?”

-Richard Gurin

Chief Executive Officer, Binney and Smith, maker of Crayola crayons

Music is a part of our society and a part of all communities – every human culture uses music to carry forward its ideas and ideals. A study of the arts provides children with an internal glimpse of other cultures and teaches them to be empathetic towards the people of these cultures. This development of compassion and empathy, as opposed to developing greed and a selfish attitude, provides bridges across different cultures that lead to a respect of other races at an early age.

Music has a great value to our economy – it creates jobs, increase’s tax base, boosts tourism and spurs growth in related businesses. Music study develops skills that are necessary in the workplace such as teamwork skills and discipline – during musical performances all members must work together to create the sounds they wish to achieve and for this regular practice is also required. Music favors working and ‘doing’ as opposed to observing, and these are the ethics employers are looking for.

Because of music’s ability to relax, calm and heal, and its optimal platform for emotions, the involvement with music helps to carve brighter attitudes – more optimism towards the future, less TV and non productive activities, low use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs and desire to develop individual abilities.

Music requires study skills, …