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Day: December 6, 2018

Now More Than Ever Education is Important

Now More Than Ever Education is Important

In our great grandsparents' time, a high school education was considered sufficient, but those days are over. These days, a college degree is a goal that an increasing number of people are pursuing and it makes sense. The job market is more advanced and competitive than ever. An individual with a broad scope of job skills has the best chance of landing the most coveted positions.

Naturally, an education marriages far more rewards than only financial success. A well-rounded education promotes thinking skills that improve our lives. Education makes us more aware so that we can better comprehend our world and value other cultures. It escalates our confidence to manage life's challenges. Also, it can be entertaining; learning more about what interests you can add joy to your life since your age. Beside, education promotes healthy brain function.

The Key to Financial Success

According to the US Census Bureau, an individual with a bachelor's degree can expect to earn an average of $ 2.1 million through their working life, while people with only a high school diploma can expect earning $ 1.2 million through their working life. This important difference in elearning potential is predicted to widen even more in coming years, as more jobs necessitate some college education, if not a degree. People with a master's degree can predict to earn $ 2.5 million through their lifetime, while those with a doctor can foresee earning $ 3.4 million and those with a professional degree can anticipate $ 4.4 million.

College graduations are also less likely to be unemployed than those with less education. The need for college-educated employees is also anticipated to remain high. In 2006, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted that between the years 2004 and 2014, 55 million jobs will be filled by entry-level workers. An estimated 13.9 million of these jobs will be filled by college-educated workers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also predicts that positions for college-educated workers will increase at a faster pace than positions for non-college grads.

Preparation for Life

Extra eaching potential is not the only aspect drawing both traditional and non-traditional (adult) students to college in large numbers. College degrees in any major progress to better discriminate and increased goal setting skills, and college degrees that focus on a number of liberal arts courses enhancement a student's personal development.

Image-educated people are more likely to attain the dialectic level of reasoning. For example, they can evaluate two or more sides of an argument and devise a logical blend of these ideas. College grads have a more reasonable view of life and of social relationships than people who are unable to evaluate such scenarios. This can progress to a better ability to get along with peers.

Keep the Brain in Shape

There is also evidence that proves that education benefits the brain's physical health. Studies have revealed that highly educated people are less likely to develop various forms of dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. The foundation behind these claims is still …

Why You Should Pursue a Career in Commercial Truck Driving

Why You Should Pursue a Career in Commercial Truck Driving

Why should you pursue a career in commercial truck driving? That is a very good question. Hopefully, by the end of this article, you will have enough valuable information to answer it yourself. So, why should anyone pursue a career in commercial truck driving? Let me start by giving you some fascinating statistics about the trucking industry.

Did you know that of all the modes of shipment in the commercial transportation industry, the trucking sector dominates the field with 83.7% of the revenue? The rail industry comes in at a distant second with only 5.6% of the total revenue. The air sector is third with 3.2%, and the oceanic freight sector is barely in the running with only 1.4% of all revenue being transported by ships. As you can see, the trucking industry isn’t going away anytime soon. In fact, the trucking industry alone collects 650 billion dollars in annual revenue each year. That’s 5% of the nation’s GDP! The trucking industry also pays out 35 billion dollars in federal, state, and highway use taxes per year and will grow by 21% over the next ten years. Not many career fields can promise you such great job security without a four year college degree like the trucking industry can.

Speaking of job security, in May of 2013 there was an estimated 1.5 million heavy truck and tractor trailer drivers earning an average median salary of $38,700 a year, which calculates to roughly $18.61 an hour. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that truck drivers who were at the lower end of the pay scale still made $25,330 a year and truck drivers who were at the high end of the pay scale made $59,620 per year. How many other jobs can boast such a wide range of salaries without a four-year or two-year college degree? Not many. So, where are more truck drivers employed than anywhere else? Texas, California, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Illinois. The state of Texas hired 157, 260 truckers in 2013 while Illinois employed an estimated 66,050 truck drivers. But, don’t think you will have to relocate to one of these five states in order to find a decent truck driving job. The entire east coast is full of states that have an average 40,210 to 157,260 working truck drivers. If you’re looking for the states with the highest concentration of truck driving jobs in the U.S. look no further. North Dakota boasts 15,310 trucking jobs with an average median salary of $47,580 while Arkansas, Nebraska, Iowa, and Wyoming follow closely. Truck drivers in Alaska have the highest median salary at $53,440, while truckers in North Dakota, Massachusetts, District of Columbia, and Wyoming make an average $47,000 a year. If you were to look at a map of the United States showing the areas where the most truck drivers are employed, you would see that truck drivers are heavily employed from Texas all the way over to Pennsylvania and Florida, and all the way up to …

5 Practical Steps To Improve Your ACT Science Score

5 Practical Steps To Improve Your ACT Science Score

There are two particular skills that you need to cultivate so that you can improve your ACT science score. Mainly, they are your 1) Reasoning skills, and 2) Analytical skills. You should be proficient when it comes to identifying data that are presented in graphs, tables and maps and in interpreting questions logically. If you are keen enough, you will find that most of the problems in the ACT Science test actually provide more information than what is necessary so that you can respond to the test items properly.

Contrary to what many students believe, your knowledge of Science branches such as Chemistry, Biology, Earth Science and Physics will not be tested directly in the Science section of the ACT. Not that you have to be well-versed with every Scientific concept that has been tackled in your high school classes as well. What you have to prioritize in order to improve your Science score are your abilities to reason accurately and solve certain problems using Scientific methods.

Your skills in Scientific reading comprehension will be challenged in the test. You need to be meticulous in analyzing and drawing conclusions from graphs, charts, tables and experimental processes. But you don’t have to fret because the passages in the Science test contain all the information that you need. Here are some tips to help you boost your score in the ACT Science test:

Helpful Tips To Boost Your ACT Science Score

  • Familiarize yourself with the types of questions and passages found in the test. There are 3 types of passages that are featured in the ACT Science test: 1) Conflicting Viewpoints (7 questions); 2) Research Summaries (6 questions), and 3) Data Representation (5 questions). These passages may be presented in a different order, but usually, test -takers are bound to encounter 3 five question sections, along with 3 six question sections and a single section that is comprised of 7 questions in the test.
  • Keep your calm when taking the test. Don’t worry so much if you haven’t brushed up on each and every Science concept taught in your school. You actually don’t need to memorize them in the ACT Science test. Remember to primarily hone your abilities in interpreting and analyzing Scientific problems, and you’ll do fine.
  • Learn proper time management. Note that you have to deal with 7 passages and 40 questions in the Science section in 35 minutes. Time element is thus your biggest hurdle. It also means that you have to be quick in answering the questions if you want to finish the section on time. Be systematic and refrain from lingering on a certain passage. Be quick in your reading by extracting the main points and analyzing figures. Take note of the difficult questions and leave them for the time being as you answer the easier ones. Get back to these tricky items when you have remaining time.
  • Cultivate your test-taking skills by taking practice tests. A reliable way of improving your ACT Science test score is